8 and 16 bit per channel in photoshop

8 and 16 bit per channel in photoshop

Photoshop knows two data modes:
• 8 bits per channel
• 16 bits per channel

WHY USE 16 BITS PER CHANNEL?

Many digital SLRs allow 12 bits per channel capture and this is later represented as 16 bits per channel in Photoshop (mostly 16 bit TIFF). If the images coming from your camera were perfect, these 4 bits would not make much of a difference as most printers only use a maximum of 8 bits. However, an image that does not require some minor correction is very rare. Once the saturation or contrast of a color image is corrected, the actual color information is soon reduced (due to rounding errors) by one or more bits. If you started with eight bits, you might end up having only six bits of real color information per channel left. The not so smooth color gradients indicate this loss. Starting with 12 bits ensures there is still a sufficient amount of color information available after even major corrections.Note: Stay as much as possible in 16 bits as you can afford (memory, disk space and performance). The test.Here is a test you can perform to experience the 16 bit vs. 8 bit difference. Open a photo in Photoshop, which is in 16 bits. Now perform some curves or levels. When finished changing the levels have a look at the histogram in the “Levels” dialog box. Open a photo in Photoshop but convert it to 8 bit just after you open the file and then do the same curves and levels operations. In the above figure you see is a histogram with many gaps. This indicates lost data and shows up in an inferior gradient smoothness, or posterization. Note: On the other side these gaps should not make you nervous. If the photo and print look fine, that’s all that counts. Conclusion: Remain as long as possible in the 16 bit mode.
Why would you ever use 8 bits per channel if 16 bits is so much better? Using 16 bits:
• Takes longer
• Needs more memory
• Creates larger files
• If you work with versions of Photoshop prior to CS many
operations (e.g. layers) are not available for 16 bits/channel. Before Photoshop CS was released, all our work was done in 8 bit layers and we also got good results. But if you have enough disk space, memory and fast processors, 16 bit is the best way to go.

Creating on off switches for your site

Creating on off switches for your site

Hi All

 

Here i am giving the Model On Off switch.

Preview

 

 

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Creating animated Melted text in Photoshop

Creating animated Melted text in Photoshop

Step 1

Create a new document in Adobe Photoshop with an dimensions of 500 X 500 Pixels.

Step 2

Fill the background colour with Black (#000000).

Image with Black background

Image with Black background

Step 3

Create a text by using Text Tool for melting effect here i am taking the text as Melting text, with an text color of White (#FFFFFF).

Image with Black background and white text

Image with Black background and white text

Step 4

Now go to blending options shown at bottom of layers panel and select Bevel & Emboss options.

Bevel And emboss Options

Bevel And emboss Options

 

Step 5

Now Rasterize   Right click on the text layer and select Rasterize select ok.

Step 6

Duplicate the text layer by pressing Ctrl+J Now Apply the filter Filter > Liquify (Shift + Ctrl +X) now drag on text it will be blurred.

Image with Black background and white text

Image with Black background and white text

Step 7

Repeat the step 6 until the text totally blurred.

Image with Black background and white text

Image with Black background and white text

Now open Animation Window > Animation now duplicate animation Frames duplicate layers that as many layers you have created in step 6.

Step 8

Duplicate the Animation layers as many as duplicated layers created in step 6.

Step 9

Now select frame1 & then Hide the all Layers beside Original Layer with the help of remove the Eye symbol.

Step 10

Now select the Frame 2 and select the second layer in layers list and hide visibility of remaining layers.

Step 11

Do the same for all layers Like step 10.

Step 12

now select the looping options shown bottom of animation window and select forever and change the frame delay time to 0.5 Sec.

looping options

looping options

Step 13

Now we have to save the image for web and Devises (Alt + Ctrl + Shift +S).

Select Gif 128 No dither from popup window and press Save.

That’s it Here is our final image.

Final image

Final image

 

Download the original file

Creating Image Poster with text

Creating Image Poster with text

Lets prepare an image which will looks like image prepared by text

Step 1

First we are going to create a new document in Photoshop with 1024×800 pixels with all the default settings.

Fill the background layer with black color.

 

1

 

Step 2

Select Horizontal Type Tool (T) and place any text (white color, caps on, font Arial) filling all background as you can see below. Only use one text layer.

 

image with text

image with text

Rotate the text by 45 Degrees

 

45 degrees rotated image

45 degrees rotated image

Step 3

Open Another image  and copy it to our canvas over text layer.

Go to Edit > Free Transform and resize photo to something similar to what I have.

photo

photo

Step 4

Select text from text layer (Ctrl+left click on text layer thumbnail in layers). Press Ctrl+Shift+I to invert selection. With selection active, select photo layer and press Delete to clear selection contents

final output

 

That’s it you are done.

 

Download the original PSD file here

Download Original PSD

HTML 5 – Semantic elements

HTML 5 – Semantic elements

The HTML5 specification includes a series of new semantic elements that is used to
give some meaning to the various sections or parts of a Web page, such as a
header, footer, navigation, and so on. In previous versions of HTML (HTML4.01), you would
typically use <div> elements to create these parts, using ID or class attributes to
differentiate them from each other. The problem with this is that this has no semantic
meaning, as there are no strict rules defined that specify what class names or IDs
are to be used, making it extremely difficult for software to determine what the
particular area is doing. HTML5 should help alleviate these issues, making it easier
for Web browsers to parse the semantic structure of a document.
It is worth pointing out that continuing to use <div> elements in HTML5 is perfectly
valid, but in order to future-proof your work, it is recommended that you use
semantic elements where relevant.

Try avoid using these new elements for purposes other than their intended. For
example, the <nav> element should not be used for just any group of links; it is
intended to surround the main navigation block on the page.
The main semantic elements that HTML5 introduces are:

<header>

This element is used to define a header for some part of a Web page, be it the
entire page, an <article> element, or a <section> element.

<footer>

Like the <header> element, this new element defines a footer for some part of
a page. A footer does not have to be included at the end of a page, article, or
section, but it typically does.

<nav>

This is a container for the primary navigation links on a Web page. This
element is not intended for use with all groups of links and should be used for
major navigation blocks only. If you have a <footer> element that contains
navigation links, you do not need to wrap these links in a <nav> element, since
the <footer> element will suffice on its own.

<article>

The <article> element is used to define an independent item on the page that
can be distributed on its own, such as a news item, blog post, or comment.
Such items are typically syndicated using RSS feeds.

<section>

This element represents a section of a document or application, such as a
chapter or a section of an article or tutorial. For example, the section you are
reading now could be surrounded by a <section> element in HTML5. <section>
elements typically have a header, although it is not strictly required. The header
for the section you are reading now would contain the text "Semantic
elements," for example.

<aside>

This new element can be used to mark up a sidebar or some other content that
is considered somewhat separate to the content around it. An example of this
might be advertising blocks.

<hgroup>

In some cases, a page, article, or section may require more than one heading,
such as where you have a title and a subtitle. This tutorial, for example, has the
title "Create modern Web sites using HTML5 and CSS3" and the subtitle
"Implementing the canvas and video elements in HTML5." You could wrap
these in an <hgroup> element, using an <h1> element for the main title
Create modern Web sites using HTML5 <h2> element for the subtitle.
The sample Web site at the end of this tutorial includes several of these new
semantic elements, and I will explain their syntax and use in more detail at that
point.